Sunday, July 08, 2007

The Saavedra Position 

I love a good story with a surprise ending and the Saavedra position is exactly that.

The Saavedra position is one of the best known chess endgame studies. It is named after the Spanish priest, Rev. Saavedra (1849-1922), who, while living in Glasgow in the late 19th century, spotted a win in a position previously thought to have been a draw.
WikiPedia

In a legendary article in the Dutch national chess magazine for November 1940, the endgame composer and writer John Selman unearthed how the famous Saavedra position came into being, in 1895, in the chess column of a Glasgow paper, the 'Weekly Citizen'.
When the well known London player Potter died in March of that year, chess editor G.E. Barbier wrote an obituary. A few weeks later, on 27 April, he published a position from one of Potter's games - remembering it wrongly, as Selman demonstrated. But precisely that was the first step to the masterpiece.

THE DISCOVERY OF THE SAAVEDRA

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