Sunday, August 17, 2008

 

Combinations 08.08.17

Morphy-de Riviere Paris 1863.

"To this day Morphy is an unsurpassed master of the open games. Just how great was his significance is evident from the fact that after Morphy nothing substantially new has been created in this field. Every player- from beginner to master- should in this praxis return again and again to the games of the American genius." ~ Mikhail Botvinnik
In this game Morphy will twice remove a defender of the g5 square and then twice setup a skewer of the c7 square.

Morphy/Morphy-DeRiviere-1863.pgn

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Wednesday, July 23, 2008

 

Semi Daily Tactic July 23, 2008

On the home front we will be getting a new Air Conditioner installed Friday and will be much cooler after that. We are getting a respite from the heat with some rain and more possible soon (Hello, Dolly!). Actually, I don't think Dolly is expected to affect us much in Houston except for some additional, needed rainfall.

Today's game is Morphy-Lowenthal, 1858.
He was one of the first masters to play a match against Morphy after the latter's arrival in London in 1858. Morphy won with a score of nine wins, three losses and two draws. "...I am convinced that I was vanquished by superior strength," Löwenthal said about the match, as reported by the Englishman Frederick Edge. No doubt aware that chess was Löwenthal's only source of livelihood, and conscious to not be considered a professional player himself, Morphy after winning the match stakes of £100, presented Löwenthal with a gift of furniture valued at £120 for his new house.

The very last move of the game (which I have removed) is a nice tactic featuring a Deflection sacrifice that will win due to a Pin and Skewer. A Deflection is forcing an enemy piece to move away from an advantageous square. So, what is Morphy's winning move in the final position?
Morphy/Morphy-Loewenthal-1858.pgn

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